Free Tool for Successful Onboarding

How important is a good onboarding plan to your organization’s success?

According to the 2012 Allied Workforce Mobility Survey, it’s critical.

Consider these statistics:

  • 25% of new employees leave in the first year
  •  Only 66% of employers include training in onboarding
  •  Only 41% have new hire workplace meetings
  •  Only 39% include milestones and goal setting

A comprehensive, well-constructed onboarding plan can make a huge impact on the success of your new employees.  That translates to increased productivity and retention.  When you weigh the cost of onboarding with the potential cost of replacing employees, it becomes an easy choice.  Replacing an employee can cost up to twice their annual salary.  Onboarding doesn’t have to be expensive – it just has to be well-planned and well-executed.

Our new Onboarding Worksheet provides you with a template for including all of the critical elements:  training, goal-setting and communication. It’s fully customizable to fit your specific program (but we’ve filled it with examples to get you started).  If you want added depth and strength in your plan, Compass offers Onboarding Services as well.

Additional Information:

Employee Turnover Caused by Bad Onboarding

How a Solid Onboarding Process Can Help You Improve Employee Retention

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August 21, 2012 at 3:41 pm

Compliance Notice – Seattle Paid Leave Law

Employees working in Seattle?  This post is for you.  If you have at least one employee working at least 240 hours in a calendar year, you will have to begin complying with the City of Seattle’s new leave law.  The law takes effect on September 1st.

Here are a few highlights:

  • All employers with Seattle employees – regardless of company location – need to comply
  • Employers with all-inclusive PTO plans don’t have to provide additional leave.  (although plans without carryover options might need to adjust)
  • Employers need to post a notice to employees of their rights under the law (a poster should be available prior to Sept, check the Seattle site)

Here is the accrual rate chart.  If your PTO plan already offers at least this much time, you won’t need to change your accruals.

Employer Size Accrual Rate Based on Hours Worked within Seattle, Beginning on First Day Worked Maximum Hours
5-49 full-time employees 1 hour leave for every 40 hours worked 40
50-249 full-time employees 1 hour leave for every 40 hours worked 56
250+ full-time employees 1 hour leave for every 30 hours worked 72

 

Our Resource page has links to both the Regulations and the FAQ sheets.  The FAQ also includes contact information for questions regarding implementation.

Jackson Lewis LLP wrote an excellent article about the law on their blog here.

 

 

 

 

August 14, 2012 at 1:45 pm

Great Song – Fun Movie

Yes, I’m working.  But Otis Redding came on and I couldn’t help but think of this film clip – cracks me up every time…

 

August 7, 2012 at 3:53 pm 1 comment

Learning Opportunities

It’s a busy week at Compass, and one of the things that’s been occupying me is looking over all of the summer learning opportunities.  There are a few that are worth checking out, especially if you’re in the Pacific NW.

  • BOLI (Bureau of Labor and Industries) has their August Event Calendar available.  This is great for HR Managers, or anyone responsible for employment compliance.
  • Oregon OSHA also has summer educational events of various types.  Did you know that organizations with as few as 3 employees need to be OSHA compliant?
  • Idea Learning Group has a fantastic Train The Trainer program open for registration.  If you’re not familiar with them, you should be.  They are fun, dynamic, and very in tune with best practices.
  • Last, but by no means least, is the ASTD-Cascadia annual conference.  The event is back in Portland for the first time in 3 years.  And it’s been re-structured as a one-day event to accommodate all of our busy schedules.  This is going to be one of the best events this year!  Note for HR professionals:  most sessions are eligible for HRCI credit!

That should keep you busy for a little while.  Happy Learning!

August 6, 2012 at 2:27 pm

HR Metrics Calculators Available Now

Two of our favorite metrics calculators are now available on the Resources page:

Why do I like these two in particular?  They help HR professionals justify the initiatives that they propose and illustrate bottom-line results in financial terms.

HR professionals should know how much profit is generated per employee.  That’s where Human Capitol ROI comes in.  This metric is necessary when making decisions about adding more employees.  Will a new division be able to make a profit if it employs a particular number of people?  Will laying off part of the workforce really impact the organization’s financial situation?

In order to make the case for employee retention strategies, it’s important to be able to compare those costs against the costs of losing existing employees.  Many leadership teams don’t truly understand all of the costs involved in replacing employees who leave.  Now you can show them!  Use the Turnover Cost Calculator to determine exactly how much it will cost to replace any position in your workforce.

These worksheets are downloadable in Excel format so you can save them on your own computer.  Special thanks to SHRM for making these available to the public.

July 30, 2012 at 12:26 pm

Kamikaze Day Trips

Aside from new babies and youthful foolishness, there really is no good reason for a normal human being to be awake at 3am.  let alone dressed for success and preparing to board a plane bound for an adjacent state.

And yet, here I am.  headed to a leadership development meeting with a first-time supervisor.  After my meeting, I’ll board another plane and return home – maybe in time to kiss my son good night.

Why do I do it?  Because sometimes face-to-face is the best way to do things.  I think at times it’s too easy for us to fall back on technology and justify the lack of contact by showing bottom-line savings.  But that’s just dollars.  What does it cost us in relationship value?  In morale?  In employee engagement?  In today’s tech-savvy landscape, face time packs an even bigger punch.

Here’s my favorite case-in-point:

Once upon a time, I was HR Manager for a small, growing firm that had just moved its headquarters from Southern California to Portland, Oregon.  We kept a small office in So-Cal, but it was a huge change for them.  Naturally, there was resentment.

Along comes an HR Manager and Finance Manager that they’ve never met.  Via phone and email they find out that we’re changing their benefits and implementing project-based accounting.  Without their active input.  My finance counterpart and I were considered their adversaries.

We tried to be empathetic.  We provided information, listened to feedback, and treated them with genuine respect and courtesy.  They still loathed us.

Finally, I decided it was high time for the two of us to show some sincerity and get our hind ends on a plane.  Stand in front of them and prove we weren’t the devil.

We planned to spend two days showing them the new systems, listening to their concerns and providing them with the context around the company decisions.  We expected to be blasted.

Once we arrived and they saw we didn’t actually have horns and pitchforks, things settled down.  After two hours of talking, most of our issues were resolved.  There was laughter.  We talked about things other than work.  We were able to return home the same day.

From then on, we had truly amazing and productive relationships.  Even some friendships that still exist after we’ve all moved on.

Why?  Because we put our travel expenses where our mouths were.  We acted like we cared.  Every time benefits renewed, I hopped a plane with our 401(k) advisor and insurance rep.  New software implementation?  Plan tickets for me and the trainers.

What did we get in return?

  • Staunch advocates for our initiatives
  • Employees who stayed longer than the circumstances warranted
  • Great morale
  • Total engagement

That’s well worth the lack of sleep and the price of a plane ticket.

July 3, 2012 at 10:00 am

Insider Tip: What I’m Looking for During an Interview

Today I am very happy to introduce you to my colleague Aimee Fahey.  She’s an HR professional specializing in talent acquisition.  She’s here today to give us some insight into what’s going on in her mind during the interview process…

There are soooo many articles out there about interviewing.  And yet there are soooo many people flubbing interviews in ways I think are so often preventable.  So, as someone who’s conducted hundreds and hundreds of interviews both by phone and in person, here are some insider tips on what drives us recruiters nuts, what makes our eyes light up in happiness, along with some other things to think about.

Remember, interviewing is a lot like dating.  You don’t need to be perfect but you do need to put your best foot forward.  Let us see who you are – this is not a trick (eventually we’ll find out who you are!).  Follow up without stalking.

Do your homework.  Hello…this does not mean just a quick scan through our website.  What stands out about our company to you?  Have you read articles about us? Bring your notepad with your prepared questions (oh, you better have questions at the end, folks), and feel free to take notes during the interview.  I love to know someone has paid attention and is interested in retaining what we talk about.

Understand our product/service.  Can you describe the product we are selling or the service we provide (or both)?  I’m amazed at how many people just apply for the job and even with time to prepare for an interview, often can’t tell me what my company’s product is that they’d be expected to sell/develop/operate/market.  If you applied for the job, you better have known what you were applying for.  Speaking of this, also understand the job. Do NOT ask the interviewer to “summarize the position” – you should already have this information!!  Instead, ask for clarification on something about the job – show you were paying attention when you applied, and are curious to know more.

Articulate your interests.  What are you passionate about and how does it tie in to this job, this company?  What in the job posting stood out and why?  Avoid cliches.  Don’t tell the interviewers that you heard we’re a great place to work if you can’t name that person who knows this for a fact, otherwise it actually comes across sounding artificial.

Know your strengths.  Be able to communicate why you think you’d be a good fit for the job (without being cocky).  What have former bosses and coworkers said they like about you?  This is a great precursor to the reference check.  (I’m thinking, is the candidate self aware?  Cool.)  PS – Remember, you can say you’re great without saying you’re the best.  Anyone who says they’re superior kinda freaks me out.

Be genuine.  I’ve got a pretty good BS detector.  Recruiting is matchmaking – I need to understand who you are so I can assess if this is a good fit.  And you’re not doing anyone any favors if you’re artificial in any way.  And guess what?  If you’re real, I’ll be real.  Try to develop a rapport with the recruiter, hiring manager, whoever is interviewing with you.  Be courteous to every single person you encounter during the process.  Be aware of stereotypes – i.e., salespeople, try not to sound too slick.  Techies, show you can talk to more than just technical people.  Don’t be fake, be self-aware.

Understand your own opportunities for growth.  While I’m not sure how many employers still ask the ‘weakness’ question directly, they’ll often try to get at it in a different way, where you know by the question they want to hear where you are not perfect.  So, with this, do NOT do a “negative that is really a positive”.  People, we’ve heard it all before and it’s, well, nauseating to listen to a candidate say “I just work too hard,” “I’m too hard on myself,” or “I’m a bit of a perfectionist.”  Instead, think about a great learning experience where you overcame a weakness – now That is cool.

Don’t waste your time or ours. This is not a Vegas poker game.  If someone asks you your salary requirements, don’t say “negotiable” or ask “what is your range?” Soooo passive aggressive.  Give them a range rather than a minimum, but do give them some numbers.  We all know that, duh, you’d be happy with a million bucks, but in the meantime, give us the range you can live with. If you have questions, ask them.  Express your concerns.  Be honest.

Under no circumstances are you to ask about benefits, paid time off, stock options, parking, etc.  If you are offered the job, you can ask those questions then.  In the meantime, as Archie Bunker would say, stifle it.  We want to know you’re interested in working for OUR company in THIS job, not when you can take your next vacation.  And along this tangent, while it’s OK to ask about the general career path about the job, please don’t ask me how soon you can be promoted. I’m here to fill This Job.

Don’t burn any bridges.  You never know who they know, or how they might cross your path in the future.  Be kind, be respectful, be considerate.  Treat the interviewer as you would like to be treated. Go for the good karma.  Thank them even if you withdraw or don’t get the job.  Ask for feedback if you don’t get the job.  If a candidate is cool, but not a fit for this role, I’ll often either keep them in mind for a different role, or refer them to companies who I think they might be a better culture &/or technical fit for.  A little goes a long way.

Got more questions?  Want to learn more?  I’d love to hear from you!

Aimee Fahey is an HR professional who loves bringing people and companies together through her work in recruiting, human resources management, career coaching and community partnerships.  Connect with her on LinkedIn or check out her “9-to-5” column on her blog, EcoGrrl.

June 13, 2012 at 11:25 am 2 comments

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